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The day of Tisha B’Av is upon us. It is one of the holiest days for Jews throughout the world. Tisha B’Av commemorates the destruction of both Temples (First and Second) by the Romans.

Tisha B’Av is notable for five main prohibitions. Jews are prohibited from:

  1. Bathing
  2. Putting on cream
  3. Wearing leather garments
  4. Intimate relations
  5. Eating or drinking

Tisha B’Av is also known for other customary traditions. Religious Jews are generally required to study a certain amount of Torah (Bible) each day. However, on Tisha B’Av, a Jew is not allowed to study Torah with the exception of several chapters throughout Jewish texts. It is also customary to sit on stools rather than chairs, as is done by people in mourning, since Jews all over the world are essentially mourning the destruction of both Temples.

However, the above 5 “no-no’s” are what most people equate Tisha B’Av with. Moreover, while all five prohibitions are considered equal, Tisha B’Av is most notable for Jews not being allowed to eat or drink. Aside from Yom Kippur, it is one of the main ‘fast days’ in Judaism.

Tisha B’Av is also a day with notorious historical accounts against Jews, and this makes commemoration all the more difficult for families under the care of Yad Ezra V’Shulamit. They are reminded of not only the destruction of the Temples, but especially of the difficult financial positon they are in. However, the fasting part of it is not much different for the families under our care. These families are sadly accustomed to foregoing a meal (or several) each day. And yet, they mourn the destruction of the Temple as much as any other Jew.

Breaking the Fast

The fast of Tisha B’Av lasts approximately 25 hours, and is broken at nightfall. This year, due to your generous donations, we have the ability to continue providing support to the families under our care not only during this mourning period, but all throughout the week. Even though it’s a particularly sad time of year, the families understand that they are not alone. We want to thank you from the bottom of our hearts for all you have done, and for making this day all the more meaningful to the families here at Yad Ezra V’Shulamit.